National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS
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Building high-fidelity spectrographs

While high resolution imaging has benefited tremendously from Adaptive Optics (AO) in the last decade (VLT NACO, SINFONI, MAD) and has allowed advances in the exoplanet field, radial velocity techniques have not. In the E-ELT area, it is now time to think the design of new radial velocity spectrographs together with an associated AO system that will allow to concentrate the starlight into a much smaller spot than when limited by the seeing and therefore will allow the fiber collecting the light to have a smaller core for the same light collecting efficiency.

Since the size of the input fiber essentially determines the size of the spectrograph, having a small fiber will allow to build smaller spectrographs that will be not only cheaper but also more stable thermo-mecanically.

In this sub-project,

 

Encircled Energy (EE) in a 0.3″ fiber for different AO parameters in colors. For comparison we present  seeing-limited performance with 0.9″ fiber (top white dashed line) and 0.3″ fiber (bottom white dashed line)

 

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